• OUR MISSION

    Like you, the diverse group of people that support job creation in Pennsylvania - "Citizens to Protect PA Jobs" - desire a quality of life for Pennsylvanians that can only be fully realized when job creation and economic growth are allowed to flourish.

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  • ISSUES

    The top priority for Citizens to Protect PA Jobs is promoting job creation and economic growth.

    In addition, we focus on the issues that directly impact job creation, including education, energy, environmental regulations, healthcare affordability and accessibility, labor laws, lawsuit abuse reform, and tax reform.

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Top Issues

Workforce Development

Pennsylvania has a workforce problem - a growing skills gap that is making it difficult for employers to find qualified job candidates to fill open positions. We're fighting to close this gap by working with businesses, educators, students and their families to help build the skilled workforce of tomorrow.


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Responsible State Spending

Government should operate within its means: evaluating the effectiveness of current programs; weeding out waste, fraud and abuse in spending; and investing wisely in worthy state-run programs that directly benefit taxpayers.



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Stop New Energy Taxes

Our natural gas industry holds the promise of economic growth and job creation. Additional taxes hinder this opportunity and drive companies to states with friendlier tax climates that share our resources. We're fighting against proposed new taxes on the industry that would pay for more state spending.

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Latest NewsVIEW ALL

Small Business Taxes Explained

Federal lawmakers have proposed tax reform legislation that provides long-overdue relief to small business job creators, which create two-thirds of new jobs in the country.

With Erie's changing work environment, officials examine workforce needs

State leaders are listening to concerns about problems facing the workforce.

Natural gas production tax gets life in state House

The potential for a tax on Marcellus shale natural gas production gained new life Wednesday, as a bill emerged from a state House committee and Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf urged leaders of the Republican-controlled chamber to speed it to a floor vote.

A severance tax won't cure the state's budget woes

Pennsylvania legislators looking to impose higher taxes on shale gas extraction under the guise of substantively closing the commonwealth's multibillion-dollar budget shortfall should look elsewhere, say researchers at the Allegheny Institute for Public Policy.

After dismal 2016, shale gas drillers begin to turn a corner

Pennsylvania's moribund drilling industry, which has struggled with persistently low prices and a dearth of infrastructure to get its product to market, is showing signs of life.

Natural gas drilling benefits Pa. jobs, economy

Pennsylvania has played a pivotal role in America's energy security since we discovered oil in Pennsylvania.

The secret war Pennsylvania is winning - but will it win Foxconn?

From the car window, the man from New Jersey can see why Pennsylvania is winning the war.

Pa. Senate approves budget balanced by drilling, utility taxes; its fate in House is unclear

After his no-new-taxes budget proposal went nowhere last weekend, Republican House Speaker Mike Turzai issued this challenge to his GOP colleagues in the state Senate:

Pa. Senate considering tax on natural gas drillers to balance budget

Working late Wednesday night to close a $2 billion gap in the state's $32 billion budget, the Republican-controlled Senate began pushing a plan to tax drilling for natural gas, and raise or impose new taxes on consumers' telephone, electric, and gas bills.

Pepsi to lay off 80 to 100, blames soda tax

With sales slumping because of the new Philadelphia sweetened beverage tax, Pepsi said Wednesday it will lay off 80 to 100 workers at three distribution plants that serve the city.

Taxing businesses even more is not a good solution

In his recent oped (The rich can take the hit - to fix the budget, they should pay their fair share), Marc Stier offers a short-sighted remedy for Pennsylvania's fiscal woes - just tax businesses more.